Featured Poet

Lex Runciman

Born and raised in Portland, Lex Runciman has lived most of his life in Oregon's Willamette Valley. Along the way, he has worked as a warehouseman, shipping-receiving clerk, and a stacker in a box mill. His newest collection of poems is Starting from Anywhere (Salmon, 2009). He is also the author of three earlier books of poems: Born and raised in Portland, Lex Runciman has lived most of his life in Oregon's Willamette Valley. Along the way, he has worked as a warehouseman, shipping-receiving clerk, and a stacker in a box mill. His newest collection of poems is Starting from Anywhere (Salmon, 2009). He is also the author of three earlier books of poems: Luck (1981), The Admirations (1989) which won the Oregon Book Award, and Out of Town (2004). He holds graduate degrees from the writing programs at the University of Montana and the University of Utah. A co-editor of two anthologies, Northwest Variety: Personal Essays by 14 Regional Authors and Where We Are: The Montana Poets Anthology, his own work has appeared in several anthologies including, From Here We Speak, Portland Lights and O Poetry, O Poesia. He was adopted at birth. He and Deborah Jane Berry Runciman have been married thirty-seven years and are the parents of two grown daughters. He taught for eleven years at Oregon State University and is now Professor of English at Linfield College, where he received the Edith Green Award in teaching in 1997. 

poems by Lex Runciman

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Recognizing the need for poetry in our lives, the Oregon Poetic Voices Project (OPV) is a comprehensive digital archive of poetry readings that will complement existing print collections of poetry across the state.

"We each carry lines of poetry with us. Words that others have written float back to us and stay with us, indelibly. We clutch these "life lines" like totems, repeat them as mantras, and summon them for comfort and laughter."

-Academy of American Poets